Monthly Archives: March 2015

Salmon & Lemon Fried Rice


Salmon

Salmon served with lemon fried rice & Salmon served on a bed of sweet potatoes, mashed

Salmon & Sweet Potato

Lemon Rice – Cape Malay Cooking & Other Delights – Salwaa SmithPacked with flavour, this zesty lemon rice is great accompanied with fish. Here I served it with Salmon fried in chilli butter


4 cups cooked rice, preferably long grain or basmati
2 tsp coriander / koljana seeds
2 Tbsp sunflower oil
2 tsp mustard seeds
8 curry leaves
3 green chillies, chopped
1 tsp grated ginger
1 ½ tsp turmeric / borrie
Juice of 2 lemons
Gently roast and then coarsely powder the coriander seeds. Keep aside.

Heat the oil in a pan and add the mustard seeds, curry leaves and green chillies. Fry till the spluttering stop, taking care not to burn the spices. Add the turmeric powder and turn off the heat.

Add the lemon juice and mix well.

Add the rice, roasted coriander powder and mix thoroughly.

To Make Chilli Butter
125 g soft salted butter
1 tsp crushed dried red chillies
Mix together the butter and dried chillies in a small bowl. Transfer and wrap the butter in clingfilm, roll it into a log. Refrigerate for 30 minutes or until the butter is hard. Cut in slices and use as required. Left over chilli butter can be frozen for later use.

Lemon Rice
© Cape Malay Cooking

 

 

 

 

 

Fish Breyani


Fish Breyani Fish Breyani

Fish Breyani – Cape Malay Cooking & Other Delights – Salwaa Smith

From My Kitchen To Yours – keeping our heritage alive since 2011!

 

Ingredients:

3 cups long grain rice or basmati rice

1½ cups frozen mixed vegetables

1 cup cooking oil

3 large potatoes

2 large onions, sliced thinly

1kg firm fish pieces of your choice, like hake or snoek

1 tomato, chopped

¼ cup buttermilk

1 – 2 green chillies, chopped

1½ tsp jeera / cumin

3 cloves

3 allspice

3 cardamoms

2 stick cinnamons

1 tsp salt

2 Tbsp butter

 

Fish Masala

7 cloves of garlic, minced

1 tsp salt

½ – 1 tsp chilli powder

3 tsp jeera / cumin

Juice of 2 lemons

1 tsp turmeric / borrie

1 Tbsp vegetable oil

 

Method:

Boil the rice in water until half done. Drain, rinse and set aside. Peel the potatoes, cut into slices. Heat the oil in saucepan, fry the potatoes until lightly browned and semi soft, set aside.

Drain excess oil from the saucepan, add the chopped onions, fry until golden brown. Add the chopped tomato, buttermilk, green chillies, jeera, cloves, allspice, cardamoms, stick cinnamon and salt.

Simmer over low to medium heat for 10 minutes or until onions are soft.

Meanwhile, make the masala to fry the fish. Combine all the spices in a small bowl, stir to combine. Wash and dry the fish pieces, smear the masala mixture all over the fish. Leave to sit for 10 minutes before frying in the left over oil used for frying the potatoes.

Arrange the potato slices at the bottom of a large heavy based pot / saucepan. Add half of the rice on top of the potatoes, spreading it evenly. Arrange the fish slices on top of the rice, then the onion mixture, then the mixed vegetables ending with the remaining rice. Dot the butter on top of the rice add 1 cup of hot water.

Cover and steam to complete over low to medium heat for about 20 minutes. Turn the heat off and leave to rest for 10 minutes before serving with lemon atchar or blatjang.

© Cape Malay Cooking

 

 

 

 

Cape Malay Koesisters


Koesisters – Cape Malay Cooking & Other Delights – Salwaa Smith

Traditional Sunday morning breakfast. Spicy version of doughnuts, this recipe makes 30 koesisters

Cape Malay Koesisters

Cape Malay Koesisters

Ingredients
500 grams cake flour (4 x 250ml)
1 teaspoon dry ginger powder
1 teaspoon cinnamon powder
1/2 teaspoon cardamom powder
2 teaspoons aniseed powder
Rind of 1 naartjie / satsuma, dried and ground (optional)
1 packet instant yeast
1/2 cup sugar
1 cup boiling water
1 dessert spoon butter
1 medium egg
milk as needed
750ml vegetable oil for frying

Method:
Using a measuring jug, melt butter and sugar in hot water. Stir in egg. Add enough milk to make 1/2 litre. Mix flour, spices and yeast into a mixing bowl. Add the liquid mixture to the dry ingredients and mix to a soft dough. Set dough aside, covered, to rise until double in size. Dip our fingers in a little oil, just to prevent the dough from sticking to your fingers. Divide dough into approx 30 small balls on a slightly oiled surface. Allow the koesisters to rise until double in size. Meanwhile heat oil in large, deep saucepan. Once the oil is very hot turn your stove down to medium to high. Gently pull the balls of dough one by one into an oblong shape and gently lower it into the hot boil. Fry each side until browned, about 2 minutes on each side. Remove with a slotted spoon and drain on absorbent paper. Cool completely.

Sugar syrup:
500ml water
250ml sugar
Boil water and sugar until sugar is dissolved and syrup is slightly thickened and sticky. Add drops of water if syrup becomes too sticky. Add the cold koesisters into the syrup a few at a time. Cook for a minute or so turning all the time so the whole koesister is coated with sugar syrup, remove from the syrup onto a serving plate. Sprinkle with desiccated coconut or make a slit in the middle of the koesister taking care not too go right through. Drop a teaspoonful of glazed coconut in the centre.

Cook’s tip:
Wash and dry the naartjie rind. Leave it out in the sun to dry out or if there’s no sunshine leave it in the oven on a very low temperature to dry out completely before grinding in a spice grinder.
To make the coconut filling
1 cup sugar
1 cup desiccated coconut
¾ cup water
3 cardamom pods
1 piece stick cinnamon
Boil all the ingredients together until all the water is evaporated and the coconut is glazed and sticky. About 10 minutes. Be careful not to burn as coconut burns very easily. The coconut mixture should be dry not watery. Remove cardamoms and stick cinnamon before using.

Little balls of dough before frying

Little balls of dough before frying

Dip our fingers in a little oil, just to prevent the dough from sticking to your fingers. Divide dough into approx 30 small balls on a slightly oiled surface.

Frying one side

Frying one side

Allow the koesisters to rise until double in size. Meanwhile heat oil in large, deep saucepan. Once the oil is very hot turn your stove down to medium to high. Gently pull the balls of dough one by one into an oblong shape and gently lower it into the hot boil. Fry each side until browned, about 2 minutes on each side.

Frying

Frying

 

Koesisters

Koesisters draining on kitchen towel after frying

Remove with a slotted spoon and drain on absorbent paper. Cool completely.

Sugared koesisters

Sugared koesisters

Sugar syrup:
500ml water
250ml sugar
Boil water and sugar until sugar is dissolved and syrup is slightly thickened and sticky. Add drops of water if syrup becomes too sticky. Add the cold koesisters into the syrup a few at a time. Cook for a minute or so turning all the time so the whole koesister is coated with sugar syrup, remove from the syrup onto a serving plate. Sprinkle with desiccated coconut or make a slit in the middle of the koesister taking care not too go right through. Drop a teaspoonful of glazed coconut in the centre.

Koesisiters

Koesisters covered with desiccated coconut

 

Koesisters3

To make the coconut filling
1 cup sugar
1 cup desiccated coconut
¾ cup water
3 cardamom pods
1 piece stick cinnamon
Boil all the ingredients together until all the water is evaporated and the coconut is glazed and sticky. About 10 minutes. Be careful not to burn as coconut burns very easily. The coconut mixture should be dry not watery. Remove cardamoms and stick cinnamon before using.

Koesisters

 

Dried naartjie / Satsuma peels

Dried naartjie / Satsuma peels

Wash and dry the naartjie rind. Leave it out in the sun to dry out or if there’s no sunshine leave it in the oven on a very low temperature to dry out completely before grinding in a spice grinder.

Dried naartjie / Satsuma peels

Dried naartjie / Satsuma peels

© Cape Malay Cooking & Other Delights

 

 

 

 

Pickled Fish (Ingelegde Vis)


Ingelegde Vis (Pickled Fish)

Pickled fish is traditionally made at Easter time. Pickled fish dates back to when there was no refrigerators and different means were used to preserve food. Any firm fleshed fish can be used to make this delectable dish. Yellow tail and Snoek are the most common fish used when making pickled fish.

Pickled Fish / Ingelegde Vis

Pickled Fish / Ingelegde Vis

Serves 6

Ingredients:
1kg snoek or any firm fish cut into large slices
1 tsp salt
1/4 cup sunflower oil
1 cup brown vinegar
1/2 cup water
1/4 cup lemon juice
1/4 cup sugar
3 large onions, sliced
1 lemon, sliced
1 – 2 tsp whole peppercorns
1 tsp salt
2 tsp ground coriander / koljana
1 tsp ground cumin / jeera
1/2 tsp turmeric /borrie
1/4 tsp dry ginger
2 tsp fish masala (optional)
1/4 teaspoon chilli powder
5 bay leaves

Method:
Wash and drain the fish. Wipe the fish dry with a clean kitchen towel. Salt the fish slices. Heat a large saucepan over medium to high heat. Add the ¼ cup of oil.  When the oil is warm, fry the fish five minutes on each side or until the fish is cooked thoroughly. Remove and set aside.

Wipe the pan with kitchen towel to remove the residue from the fried fish, and add the sliced onions and fry till they turn golden. Add the liquids and spices, bring to boil, turn low and simmer for about five minutes. Turn off heat, let cool to warm.

Fried Fish

Fried Fish

Fish2

Arrange the fish chunks and sliced lemon in a Pyrex or glass dish, and pour the sauce over. Cover, and refrigerate for a day or two before eating for the flavours to develop. The flavour improves the longer it’s left before eating and will keep up to 2 weeks in the refrigerator. Serve cold with crusty buttered bread.

Pickled Fish / Ingelegde Vis

Pickled Fish / Ingelegde Vis

Click here for details of where to buy the NEW Cape Malay & Other Delights Cookbook.

Paella


Paella - Cape Malay Cooking

Paella – Cape Malay Cooking

Serves 6
1kg seafood mix
3 large onions, finely sliced
Oil for frying
200gr mushrooms, sliced
1 large green pepper, finely sliced
1 large red pepper, finely sliced
1 large yellow pepper, finely sliced
3 cups uncooked basmati rice
Salt and Tabasco sauce to taste
Fresh chopped parsley for garnishing (optional)

Marinade
2 tbsp peri-peri, chilli or chutney sauce
2 tsp crushed garlic
1 tsp paprika
Salt and pepper to taste
5ml Tabasco sauce

Combine marinade ingredients in a mixing bowl, add seafood mix and marinate for about 1 hour. Meanwhile, fry onions in heated oil until golden. Add mushrooms and fry a further 5-10 minutes, or until softened. Remove onions and mushrooms from pan and set aside. Fry peppers in oil for 5 minutes, remove from pan and set aside. Transfer seafood and marinade to frying pan and fry for 15 minutes. Meanwhile, boil rice in salted water until tender, about 20 minutes. Drain and rinse. Layer ingredients in a large saucepan as follows: first rice, then onions and mushrooms (reserving some onion and mushroom for garnishing) then the peppers and finally the seafood mixture. Continue layering until all ingredients have been used, sprinkling each layer with a little salt and Tabasco sauce. Steam, covered, over medium heat for 30 minutes. Garnish with reserved onions, mushrooms and chopped parsley if using. Serve with lemon atchar and enjoy

Seafood Paella

Seafood Paella

© Cape Malay Cooking

International Women’s Day


Many of you only know me by Cape Malay Cooking & Other Delights however since its International Women’s Day tomorrow (08/03/15) I’d like to share my story with you all, Insha’Allah/ God willing I hope to inspire you all to follow your dreams and aspirations in life.

My interest in baking started in the kitchen with my mother being her assistant peeling the potatoes and taking mental notes of recipes and handy tips, you’d think by me spending all the time in the kitchen I’d one day be a brilliant cook but once I got married and left the nest I felt lost in the kitchen I had no clue what I was doing! Cooking was very much my mother’s domain, I was the baker which suited me perfect at the time because my sweet tooth was always pleased!

My husband will often recall the first time I cooked a meal and what an inedible disaster it was, I bravely and very confidently told him that morning I was going to cook fish frikadel. I wish I hadn’t, it turned out burnt, mushy and definitely did not look like the way my mother’s use to.

However, that did not put me off cooking, I was determined and dedicated my time to perfect my cooking skills. Inspiring and words of praise from my family was what really determined me, my mother inspired me to do better and was always ready to criticise and advise me. My husband bought me Faldiela Williams cook books and from then onwards everything changed and I can safely say my cooking has changed for the better, the aromas, colours and pure passion to be found in Cape Malay cooking is a form of art all on its own.

In 2007 I attended a women empowering course where I learnt, suffice to say, words CHANGE LIVES. The course taught us that words can move mountains but they can also break spirits. They can also build, support, and yes, EMPOWER. Words have brilliance and the potential power to set free emotions strong enough to overwhelm each and every one of us. Words provoke us, inspire us and motivate, make us fall in love, go to war and save lives. We need to as women, encourage and support each other after all we can most likely relate to each other. I feel I have honestly felt the support from YOU ALL with your many words of encouragement.

Thank you all (87 000+ FOLLOWERS) for your continuous support.

Who inspires you and why?

Salwaa Smith – Cape Malay Cooking & Other Delights

womens day

Cape Malay Cooking’s Publications


Download yours today!

Cape Malay Cooking & Other Delights - Salwaa Smith

Cape Malay Cooking’s mobile app is now available to download on ITunes as well as Google Play to be used on iPhone, iPad and all Android devices.

100 delicious Cape Malay Cooking recipes at your fingertips whenever and wherever you need it. Download yours today!

images (2)images (4)

Screenshot (6)

View original post

%d bloggers like this: