Carrots and Pea Bredie

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Salwaa’s Carrots & Peas Bredie

Carrot & Pea Bredie

Salwaa Smith – Cape Malay Cooking & Other Delights

From My Kitchen To Yours – keeping our heritage alive for the past 10 years!

Ingredients:

2 Tbsp cooking oil

1 large onion, peeled and chopped

500g mutton, lamb or beef pieces

800g carrots cut into julienne strips

3 large potatoes, peeled and cut into quarters

1½ cups frozen peas

1/2 tsp ground allspice or 5 whole allspice

1-2 green chillies

2 tsp salt or to taste

Hot water as needed

Chopped parsley for garnishing

Method:

Heat oil in a large saucepan and braise onions until golden brown, 5-10 mins.

Add washed and drained meat and braise until dark brown, 10-15 mins.

The meat should be as brown as you can get it.

Add salt, chillies, allspice and enough water; simmer until meat is nearly tender, 15-20 minutes or longer if using mutton.

Add carrots and potatoes, cook until potatoes are nearly soft.

Add frozen peas and cook a further 10 mins or until potatoes are soft.

Garnish with chopped parsley.

Serve with white rice and atchars.

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Afghan Biscuits

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I adapted the Afghan biscuit recipe from More Cape Malay Cooking by Faldela Williams

This biscuit is so called because it resembles that of an Afghan turban, writes the late Faldela Williams.

Ingredients:

200g soft butter

1/2 cup castor sugar

1 & 1/2 cups cake flour, sifted

3 tablespoons cocoa powder

1 cup cornflakes

1/2 cup chopped walnuts

Milk chocolate to finish

Method:

Pre-heat oven to 180°C.

Cream the butter and castor sugar until light and fluffy.

Mix the flour and cocoa with the butter mixture.

Mix in cornflake and walnuts.

Mixture should resemble a soft dough.

Drop teaspoonfuls of dough onto baking tins lined with greaseproof or parchment paper.

Bake for about 12 -15 minutes.

Cool slightly in the tins before removing.

Allow to cool completely before drizzling with melted chocolate.

Top the chocolate with half a walnut, optional.

Makes about 30 biscuits.

Find more recipes like this in Salwaa’s Biscuits and Cakes Ebook

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How To Make Homemade Bread

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Salwaa’s Homemade Bread Video Tutorial

Here I share with you my homemade bread recipe. Traditionally homemade bread was made every Sunday in most households for a light supper in the evening. I serve my bread with corned beef, polony, cheese or left over Sunday roast.

Salwaa Smith – Cape Malay Cooking & Other Delights

From My Kitchen To Yours – keeping our heritage alive!

Ingredients:
4 cups bread flour
1 tsp salt
1 tbsp sugar
2 tsps yeast
3 tbsp oil
1½ – 2 cups lukewarm water

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Homemade Bread

Tuna Breyani

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Salwaa’s Tuna Breyani

Salwaa Smith – Cape Malay Cooking & Other Delights
From My Kitchen To Yours – keeping our heritage alive!

Ingredients:
2 cups long grain rice
2-3 tins of tuna
1 cup frozen mixed vegetables
1 cup vegetable oil
3 potatoes
2 large onions, sliced thinly sliced
1 tomato, chopped
¼ cup buttermilk
1 – 2 green chillies, chopped
1 ½ tsp jeera / cumin
3 cloves
3 allspice
3 cardamoms
2 stick cinnamons
1 tsp salt
2 Tbsp butter
2 tsp fish masala
2 tsp garlic, minced
1 tsp salt
½ – 1 tsp chilli powder
Juice of 2 lemons
1/2 tsp turmeric / borrie

Method:
Boil the rice in water until half done. Drain, rinse and set aside. Peel the potatoes, cut into slices. Heat the oil in saucepan, fry the potatoes until lightly browned and semi soft, set aside. Drain excess oil from the saucepan, add the chopped onions, fry until golden brown. Add the chopped tomato, buttermilk, green chillies, jeera, cloves, allspice, cardamoms, stick cinnamon and salt. Simmer over low to medium heat for 10 minutes or until onions are soft.

Meanwhile, combine all the spices with the lemon juice in a small bowl, stir to combine. Pour over tuna. Arrange the potato slices at the bottom of a large heavy based pot / saucepan. Add half of the rice on top of the potatoes, spreading it evenly.

Arrange the tuna with the masala on top of the rice on top of the rice, then the onion mixture, then the mixed vegetables ending with the remaining rice. Dot the butter on top of the rice add 1 cup of hot water.

Cover and steam to complete over low to medium heat for about 10 minutes. Turn the heat off and leave to rest for 10 minutes before serving with lemon atchar or blatjang.

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Continue reading Tuna Breyani

Green Bean and Lamb Stew

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Salwaa’s Green Beans Stew

A simple yet tasty recipe for green beans stew or bredie as we know it in Cape Town. Easy to make, a great idea for a healthy and nutritious meal. Here I used trimmed fine beans. Best of all 3 heaped tablespoons green beans equals one of your 5 a day.

Salwaa Smith – Cape Malay Cooking & Other Delights

Ingredients:

1 Tbsp vegetable oil
600g lamb pieces
1 large onion, chopped
1½ tsp salt
2 – 3 green chillies, chopped
1 Tbsp spoon sugar, optional
3 cloves
3 all spice
1kg green beans, sliced diagonally
3 large potatoes, quartered

Green Bean Stew served with basmati rice and atchar

Method:

Wash and drain the meat. Heat the oil in a large pot and braise the onions until deep golden brown.

Add the lamb pieces and garlic and cook until nearly tender about 40 minutes adding water as necessary.

Add the salt, chillies, cloves, allspice and green beans as well as the potatoes.

Cook until the potatoes are soft and tender adding water for thinner gravy.

Serve with boiled rice and atchar. Serves 6

Atchars are available in store at 377 on Imam Haron Road, Lansdowne or online at www.capemalaydelights.store

We deliver nationwide. Please check out our website for products.

Mango atchar, lemon atchar, mix veg atchar

Always braise meat until very dark in colour, carefully watching it, so that it doesn’t burn to get a nice dark colour stew.

All content and media is the property of Salwaa Smith and Cape Malay Delights (PTY) LTD.

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Dried Fish and Cabbage

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Salwaa’s Dried Fish & Cabbage

Salwaa Smith – Cape Malay Cooking & Other Delights
From My Kitchen To Yours – keeping our heritage alive!

SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURES

As we discovered on our recent trip to Portugal, Bacalhau (salted cod fish), is the most popular ingredient in Portuguese cooking. Traditionally there are more than 365 different dishes, one for each day of the year.  

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Salted Cod – Bacalhau

This reminded me of the dried snoek and cabbage bredie my grandmother and aunty used to make. So naturally we bought a small piece of salted cod which is similar to hake as we know it.

IMG_1541

 

So today I share my grandmother’s recipe with you. What are your memories of this dish?

Salwaa’s Dried Fish & Cabbage

Ingredients:
1 medium cabbage
300g saltfish
1 large onion, peeled and chopped
2 Tbsp cooking oil
3 cloves garlic, peeled and finely grated
2 green chillies, or according to taste
1/4 tsp black pepper
3 medium potatoes, peeled and cut into half
Salt, if needed

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Salted Cod – Bacalhau

 

Method:
Soak the salt fish in water for about 30 minutes to remove excess salt.

 

Heat the oil in a large pot. Add the onions and garlic, sauté until golden brown.

In the meantime slice or shred the cabbage finely.

When the onion is nice and golden, add the cabbage, potatoes, chillies and pepper.

IMG_3972

Stir and cook until the potatoes is almost soft. Add drops of water if needed.

The cabbage must be a deep golden brown.

Strain the fish in a colander, pick or cut the fish into small pieces.

Add the fish to the cabbage, stir gently to combine.

IMG_6213

Simmer a further 10 minutes.

Taste for salt and add according to you taste buds.

Serve with white rice, homemade blatjang or lemon atchar.

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Here’s my complete recipe:

Salwaa’s Dried Fish & Cabbage

Ingredients:
1 medium cabbage
300g saltfish
1 large onion, peeled and chopped
2 Tbsp cooking oil
3 cloves garlic, peeled and finely grated
2 green chillies, or according to taste
1/4 tsp black pepper
3 medium potatoes, peeled and cut into half
Salt, if needed

Method:
Soak the salt fish in water for about 30 minutes to remove excess salt.

Heat the oil in a large pot. Add the onions and garlic, sauté until golden brown.

In the meantime slice or shred the cabbage finely.

When the onion is nice and golden, add the cabbage, potatoes, chillies and pepper.

Stir and cook until the potatoes is almost soft. Add drops of water if needed.

The cabbage must be a deep golden brown.

Strain the fish in a colander, pick or cut the fish into small pieces.

Add the fish to the cabbage, stir gently to combine.

Simmer a further 10 minutes.

Taste for salt and add according to you taste buds.

Serve with white rice, homemade blatjang or lemon atchar.

Cook’s Note:
Use dried snoek or 2 tins tuna
I used a “spitskop” cabbage

 

Koesister Pre-Mix
Koesister Pre-Mix


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Cape Malay & Other Delights Cookbook

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You are cordially invite…

Cape Malay & Other Delights Cookbook Launch by Salwaa Smith

Cost of my cookbook ONLY – R199 + R10 P&P within Cape Town and R25 nationwide.


3 course Cape Malay meal + a signed copy of my cookbook R250

Menu on the day will be:
Starter – cocktails pies, samosas, tandoori chicken, spicy meatballs
Main – lamb and chicken akhni
Dessert – assortment of Cape Malay biscuits, Cape Malay fancies (cream cakes) + tea, coffee & juice

Guest speakers – Mogamat Kammie Kamedien, independent slave scholar & community heritage activist
Vanessa De Bruin – family friend

Entertainment – members from the Young Men’s Malay Choir, the oldest and largest Malay Choir in South Africa

Abidah Dixon Mohamed from CTV’s “Proe” program will cover the event which will be broadcasted on CTV

When: 7th June 2015 @ 12pm
Venue: Grassy Park Civic Centre
Corner 5th Ave and Victoria Road,
Grassy Park

Tickets are selling fast, reserve your space as soon as possible, we can ONLY accommodate 500 people (tickets are ONLY R250 which includes lunch, entertainment and a signed copy of my 120 page hard cover cookbook)

To book call: 078 606 9655
WhatsApp: 074 841 7495
Email: enquiries@capemalaycooking.me

RSVP before 31st May 2015 (extended from the 22nd to allow people to pay for the tickets)

We will also be selling books only at the introductory price of R199 on the day of the launch at Grassy Park Civic Centre for those unable to attend the lunch. Books will only be available from myself and will be available in stores towards the end of July 2015. Contact details above.

Those outside of South Africa who wants to purchase a copy of my book may do so via amazon.co.uk, worldwide delivery. Just search for Cape Malay Cookbook or ISBN 0620526505.

Thank you, I’m looking forward to meeting you all. God Bless.
Salwaa

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Cookbook Launch
Cookbook Launch

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Cape Malay Koesisters

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Koesisters – Cape Malay Cooking & Other Delights – Salwaa Smith

Traditional Sunday morning breakfast. Spicy version of doughnuts, this recipe makes 30 koesisters

Cape Malay Koesisters
Cape Malay Koesisters

Ingredients
500 grams cake flour (4 x 250ml)
1 teaspoon dry ginger powder
1 teaspoon cinnamon powder
1/2 teaspoon cardamom powder
2 teaspoons aniseed powder
Rind of 1 naartjie / satsuma, dried and ground (optional)
1 packet instant yeast
1/2 cup sugar
1 cup boiling water
1 dessert spoon butter
1 medium egg
milk as needed
750ml vegetable oil for frying

Method:
Using a measuring jug, melt butter and sugar in hot water. Stir in egg. Add enough milk to make 1/2 litre. Mix flour, spices and yeast into a mixing bowl. Add the liquid mixture to the dry ingredients and mix to a soft dough. Set dough aside, covered, to rise until double in size. Dip our fingers in a little oil, just to prevent the dough from sticking to your fingers. Divide dough into approx 30 small balls on a slightly oiled surface. Allow the koesisters to rise until double in size. Meanwhile heat oil in large, deep saucepan. Once the oil is very hot turn your stove down to medium to high. Gently pull the balls of dough one by one into an oblong shape and gently lower it into the hot boil. Fry each side until browned, about 2 minutes on each side. Remove with a slotted spoon and drain on absorbent paper. Cool completely.

Sugar syrup:
500ml water
250ml sugar
Boil water and sugar until sugar is dissolved and syrup is slightly thickened and sticky. Add drops of water if syrup becomes too sticky. Add the cold koesisters into the syrup a few at a time. Cook for a minute or so turning all the time so the whole koesister is coated with sugar syrup, remove from the syrup onto a serving plate. Sprinkle with desiccated coconut or make a slit in the middle of the koesister taking care not too go right through. Drop a teaspoonful of glazed coconut in the centre.

Cook’s tip:
Wash and dry the naartjie rind. Leave it out in the sun to dry out or if there’s no sunshine leave it in the oven on a very low temperature to dry out completely before grinding in a spice grinder.
To make the coconut filling
1 cup sugar
1 cup desiccated coconut
¾ cup water
3 cardamom pods
1 piece stick cinnamon
Boil all the ingredients together until all the water is evaporated and the coconut is glazed and sticky. About 10 minutes. Be careful not to burn as coconut burns very easily. The coconut mixture should be dry not watery. Remove cardamoms and stick cinnamon before using.

Little balls of dough before frying
Little balls of dough before frying

Dip our fingers in a little oil, just to prevent the dough from sticking to your fingers. Divide dough into approx 30 small balls on a slightly oiled surface.

Frying one side
Frying one side

Allow the koesisters to rise until double in size. Meanwhile heat oil in large, deep saucepan. Once the oil is very hot turn your stove down to medium to high. Gently pull the balls of dough one by one into an oblong shape and gently lower it into the hot boil. Fry each side until browned, about 2 minutes on each side.

Frying
Frying

 

Koesisters
Koesisters draining on kitchen towel after frying

Remove with a slotted spoon and drain on absorbent paper. Cool completely.

Sugared koesisters
Sugared koesisters

Sugar syrup:
500ml water
250ml sugar
Boil water and sugar until sugar is dissolved and syrup is slightly thickened and sticky. Add drops of water if syrup becomes too sticky. Add the cold koesisters into the syrup a few at a time. Cook for a minute or so turning all the time so the whole koesister is coated with sugar syrup, remove from the syrup onto a serving plate. Sprinkle with desiccated coconut or make a slit in the middle of the koesister taking care not too go right through. Drop a teaspoonful of glazed coconut in the centre.

Koesisiters
Koesisters covered with desiccated coconut

 

Koesisters3

To make the coconut filling
1 cup sugar
1 cup desiccated coconut
¾ cup water
3 cardamom pods
1 piece stick cinnamon
Boil all the ingredients together until all the water is evaporated and the coconut is glazed and sticky. About 10 minutes. Be careful not to burn as coconut burns very easily. The coconut mixture should be dry not watery. Remove cardamoms and stick cinnamon before using.

Koesisters

 

Dried naartjie / Satsuma peels
Dried naartjie / Satsuma peels

Wash and dry the naartjie rind. Leave it out in the sun to dry out or if there’s no sunshine leave it in the oven on a very low temperature to dry out completely before grinding in a spice grinder.

Dried naartjie / Satsuma peels
Dried naartjie / Satsuma peels

© Cape Malay Cooking & Other Delights

 

 

 

 

Roast Leg Of Lamb

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Roast lamb

Serves 6 – 8

Serve this tender lamb with your favorite gravy and vegetables.

Ready in 3 hours – 3 1/2 hours, dependent on the size of your leg of lamb

Ingredients:

1 large head of garlic, lightly crushed

10 cloves

10 allspice berries

7 bay leaves

2 sprigs of fresh rosemary

1 whole large leg of lamb, bone in (about 2.5kg)

Salt & pepper to taste

 

Trim excess fat and rinse the leg of lamb under running water.

Preheat the oven to 190C.

Put the lamb into a large roasting tin /Pyrex dish . Using a sharp knife, make cuts in the lamb, about 1.5cm apart, all the way to the bone.

 

Rub salt and pepper all over the leg of lamb, don’t skimp on the pepper!

 

Lightly crush a head of garlic, not necessary to peel but do remove excess peels.

 

Scatter the head of garlic, cloves, allspice, bay leaves around the leg of lamb.

 

Top with the sprigs of rosemary.

 

Add a cup of water. Cover with foil. Cook in a preheated oven at 190C for 3 – 3 1/2 hours.

 

In the meantime prepare your vegetables. Remember you can use any vegetables you like.

Wash and half, if necessary, 1 kg baby potatoes. Drain excess water. Add the potatoes in a roasting / Pyrex dish. Add salt and crushed black pepper to taste. Drizzle a tablespoon or two olive oil over the potatoes and add a quarter cup of water.  Cover with foil. Pop in the oven an hour before the leg of lamb is done. The potatoes will turn out crispy on the outside and soft in the inside.

 

Leg of lamb halfway through the cooking time.

 

Peel, de-seed and slice butternut into small pieces. Peel carrots and cut into smaller pieces. Melt 50g unsalted butter and 50ml vegetable oil in a saucepan. When the butter/oil begins to bubble add a a couple of stick cinnamon and the butternut pieces. Brown on each side.

 

Add the carrots, toss lightly so that the carrots are coated with the butter/oil mixture. Season to taste (salt and a bit of pepper will do) Cover and allow to steam over low heat until the vegetables are soft but not mushy.

 

Roasted potatoes.

 

Butternut and carrots, cooked.

 

Ready to eat 🙂

Serve with homemade peppercorn sauce

Ingredients:

3 – 4 tablespoons black peppercorns

80g butter

1 large onion, minced

120ml beef stock

100ml fresh cream

salt to taste

Method:

Crush the peppercorns slightly, either using a mortar and pestle or a rolling pin.

Melt the butter in a saucepan over medium high heat. Add the onions and saute until soft, about 3 minutes. Add the peppercorns and boil for another 3 minutes. Add beef stock and boil another 3 minutes.

Just before serving, add the cream and reduce the heat to medium. Heat through, but don’t allow the peppercorn sauce to boil. Once the sauce is at your desired thickness, test for seasoning. Add salt if necessary, then serve immediately.

Enjoy 🙂

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SPONSORSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

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Sponsor

In order for us here at Cape Malay Cooking to continue our FREE service of providing authentic Cape Malay recipes, advise, etc to the community we have decided to offer sponsorship opportunities to home industries, small businesses and selected companies. We all know there is no better way to get the word out about your product than with the help of a trusted source. We are here to help you do that.

 
By being a sponsor on Cape Malay Cooking’s website, your product will be exposed to the hundreds of thousands of visitors, readers, and followers my blog and other social media platforms receives each month. This equates to more traffic for you, and that in turn can mean a higher income for your business or more product sales.
Let me tell you why you should take advantage of this great new opportunity.

 

Statistics and Exposure

  • Cape Malay Cooking has existed for almost 4 years and has built up a huge readership and following in that time.
  • Every week I post 3-4 new recipes and/or articles. This consistent updating means your product or business is guaranteed to receive ongoing exposure.
  • 99% of those updates are accepted to multiple food sharing websites (i.e. My Taste South Africa & My Taste South Africa) Visitors from those sites are exposed to your products or business.
  • We have thousands of RSS feed readers and email newsletter subscribers.
  • Over 100,000+ visitors per week
  • An average of 50% organic search engine referrals, which means you’ll also be exposed to a non-food world-wide audience.
  • A total of 78,000 + social media followers, friends, fans, and subscribers
  • 69,000 blog subscribers.
    (The numbers are as of 7th October 2014 and increase every day, plus traffic is on a steady upswing.)

 

Options & Pricing
The following are the available options for your Facebook, website, product, or company’s advert. All ads are featured on left side according to selected option.
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  • Only one available each month!
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  • The “Sponsor Spotlight” post is broadcasted to all my readers, social media followers, RSS feed and email subscribers
  • You will also be included in the monthly “Meet Our Sponsors” post
  • Three Cape Malay Cooking recipes posts will link to your page or website. (seen by visitors, readers, email & feed subscribers)
  • One month of repeated social media promotion (Google+, Twitter, Facebook, Instagram & Pinterest)
  • All for the price of ZAR250 for one month

 

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Eid Recipes

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Here follows a quick round-up of popular Eid dishes.

Click on the links for the recipes. Continue reading Eid Recipes

Shepherd’s Pie (Oond Frikkadel)

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Shepherd’s Pie  also known as Oond Frikkadel or Cottage Pie is a classic dish which pretty much everyone I’ve ever met has their own way of making. This is my way which I’ve kept really simple and it’s a winner every time I make it. Make sure you buy the best quality mince you can afford, as it really makes the dish, there’s nothing worse than an oily and fatty cottage pie.  This recipe serves 6.

Shepherd’s pie” is made from lamb (hence “shepherd”), while “cottage pie” is made with beef.

Shepherd’s Pie, Cottage Pie, Oond Frikkadel

Ingredients:

500g fat free minced meat

1 medium onion

1 small green pepper

1 medium tomato

1/2 bunch dhanya

1/2 teaspoon nutmeg

5 cloves garlic, grated

1 slice bread soaked in water (preferably day or two old)

1 large egg

salt & pepper to taste

 

Method:

Wash and drain minced meat well.

Soak bread in water and squeeze excess water out.

Chop onion, pepper, tomato, dhanya finely.

Add all the ingredients in a mixing bowl and mix thoroughly using your hands.

Transfer the mixture into an oven proof dish.

Bake in a preheated oven for 30-40 minutes at 180C.

Top with mashed potatoes and sprinkle with grated nutmeg.

Grill in the oven until top is slightly browned.

Serve with yellow rice, steamed vegetables or fresh salad.

Yellow Rice

 

 

Yellow Rice Recipe

Serves 6

Ingredients:

2 cups uncooked basmati rice

¼ teaspoon turmeric

5 cardamom pods, crushed

3 stick cinnamons

50g butter

1 teaspoon salt

¼ cup sugar

½ cup raisins, optional

 

Method:

I always parboil my rice and then rinse as I don’t like the starch on the rice.

Using a large saucepan parboil the rice until half cooked approximately 5- 7 minutes.

Pour into a colander, rinse and return to the saucepan. Add the rest of the ingredients with a cup of water. Stir gently. Heat your saucepan over medium heat. Simmer for 6 minutes. Stir with a fork to fluff and loosen the grains, turn the heat off. Leave the sealed saucepan on the stove, the retained heat will complete the cooking process and any water left will be absorbed leaving you with fluffy and tender yellow rice.

 

Perfect with bobotie, frikkadel, roast, etc…

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Roast Leg Of Lamb

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Roast lamb

Serve this tender lamb with your favourite gravy and vegetables.

Ready in 2 hours 30 minutes

Ingredients:

10 cloves of garlic

10 cloves

10 bay leaves

1 whole large leg of lamb, bone in (about 2.2kg)

Salt & pepper to taste

Method:

1. Preheat the oven to 190C.

2. Put the lamb into a large roasting tin. Using a sharp knife, make cuts in the lamb, about 1.5cm apart, all the way to the bone.

3. Stuff 1 clove of garlic, clove, bay leave into the each of the cuts. Rub the leg of lamb with salt and pepper according to taste. Add a cup of water into the tin. Cover the tin loosely with foil and roast for 1 hour 30 minutes, adding more water if necessary. Remove the foil and cook for another 30 minutes.

4. Put the meat on a platter, cover loosely with foil and leave in a warm place to rest for 15 minutes before carving. Serve with gravy, roast potatoes, a selection of vegetables of your choice.

ROAST LEG OF LAMB

Arabian Breyani

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Arabian Breyani

 

Ingredients
2 tablespoons butter
4 tablespoons onion, choppel
1 tablespoon ginger, minced
4 garlic cloves, peeled and minced
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
Pinch saffron or turmeric
Pinch cayenne pepper, optional
½ cup low-fat plain yogurt
1½ pounds boneless lamb, cubed
salt and pepper to taste
2 cups cooked basmati rice, stirred with a pinch of saffron or turmeric

Garnish
2 tablespoons shredded or whole almonds
1 tablespoon golden raisins
1 hard-boiled egg, quartered
1 teaspoon chopped parsley

Method
Heat 1 tablespoon of the butter in a saucepan. Add the onion, ginger, garlic, cinnamon, turmeric, and cayenne pepper and sauté over medium heat for about 3 minutes.

Combine the onion mixture with the yogurt in the blender and puree until smooth. Set this mixture aside.

Heat the remaining butter and sauté the meat, a few pieces at a time, until golden on all sides. Season with the salt and pepper then add the yogurt mixture, cover the saucepan, and simmer over low heat for 20 minutes. Remove lid and simmer for another 15 minutes, stirring occasionally.

Combine the meat with the rice and smooth the mixture into a large baking dish. You may cover the mixture with foil and refrigerate until ready to serve or bake the mixture in a preheated oven for 25 minutes at 170C. Garnish before serving.

Mavrou

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Mavrou
A Cape Malay traditional dish which is usually served at weddings, on Eid and other special occasions. Mavrou is a very colourful dish and is usually made with steak.

Mavrou
Mavrou

Ingredients:
1 kg cubed steak or goulash
10 ml salt
10 ml ground jeera (cumin)
15 ml ground koljana (coriander)
10 ml barishap (fennel seeds)
15 ml crushed red chillies
3 cloves
3 whole all spice
10 ml ground ginger
10 ml ground garlic
3 cardamom pods
3 cinnamon sticks

Few strands saffron (optional)
4 large onions, thinly sliced

Oil for braising onions
2 large tomatoes, grated

Method:
• Combine all spices and mix well with meat. Marinate for at least an hour.
• Heat oil in large pot and braise onions until soft and golden, adding water when necessary.
• Add meat and cook covered until soft, adding water when necessary.
• Serve with white or savoury rice decorated with boiled eggs cut into quarters.

VARIATION:

Served with steamed mix vegetables of peas.

PUFF PASTRY

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PUFF PASTRY

This is the richest of all pastries and benefits from being made the day before use.

Ingredients:

450g cake flour

Pinch salt

450g firm butter or margarine

250ml cold water with a squeeze of lemon juice (approximate)

Method:

  1. Mix the flour and salt together. Place butte on a place and work with a knife until soft. Rub a small knob of butter into the flour.
  1. Add water and lemon juice to form a fairly soft, elastic dough.
  1. Knead lightly on a floured surface until smooth
  1.  Form the rest of the butter into an oblong, see “cook’s tip”. Roll pastry into a square.
  1. Place the block of butter on one half of the square, fold other half of pastry over it. Seal edges. Turn the pastry so the fold is on one side, then roll out a strip three times longer that it is wide. Fold the bottom third up and the top third down and seal edges.
  1. Cover pastry with greaseproof paper and leave to rest in a cool place for approximately 20 minutes.
  1. Turn the pastry so that the folds are to the sides and roll, fold and rest as before until this has been done about six times altogether. After final resting, shape pastry as required. Bake at 230C

Cook’s Tip:

  • To form the block of butter into an oblong, roll out butter between two sheets of greaseproof paper.
  • Always take care to roll out the pastry away from you and do not break the air bubbles that will rise.
  • Ensure the butter used is cold and hard, if necessary chill for 20 minutes after dividing into four portions.
  •  If the butter comes through the pastry and sticks to the surface put the mixture back in the fridge to harden as the butter has become too soft with rolling and handling.
  • If the pastry rises unevenly, it may be due to the pastry being badly rolled and folded. When rolling keep sides straight and always fold into a true oblong.

Chocolate Coconut Dream Cookie

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CHOCOLATE COCONUT DREAM COOKIE

Delicious chocolate, coconut and oats biscuits,  the whole family as well as the chocolate addicts will enjoy this biscuit.

Chocolate Coconut Dreams
Chocolate Coconut Dreams

CHOCOLATE COCONUT DREAMS

Ingredients:

2 cups plain flour

2 cups rolled oats

1 cup sugar

1 ¼ cup desiccated coconut

250g soft butter

5ml bicarbonate of soda

25ml boiling water

25ml cocoa powder

25ml golden syrup

2 large eggs, beaten

To complete: 150g cooking chocolate

 

Method:

Combine flour, oats, sugar & coconut in a large mixing bowl.

Rub in butter with finger tips to resemble fine crumbs.

Pour boiling water over bicarbonate of soda, stir in cocoa powder and golden syrup.

Beat eggs well and combine all ingredients. Mix well to form soft dough.

Divide into approx. 30 small balls. Place on a baking tray and press flat with a fork.

Bake in a preheated oven at 190C for 10-12 minutes.

Cool on a cooling rack and decorate with melted cooking chocolate.

 

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MINI SAUSAGE ROLLS

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This is a firm favourite in my house at anytime. So easy to prepare. I usually make a batch to freeze, so there is always something to cook when unexpected quests arrive or whenever the kids feel like nibbling.

MINI SAUSAGE ROLLS

Makes 16

 

Ingredients:

500g ready-made puff pastry

Flour for dusting

1 egg, beaten

8 good quality sausages cut into two

Salt and freshly ground black pepper

Small handful fresh thyme leaves

 

Method:

Preheat the oven to 200C

Roll the pastry out on a floured surface to a rectangle of about 48x32cm.

 

Cut the large rectangle in half lengthways, then cut both smaller rectangles into eight equal sections. You now have 16 rectangles in total. Brush one end of each rectangle with a little of the beaten egg, lay a piece of sausage at the other end, then season the sausage with salt and freshly ground black pepper and sprinkle with thyme leaves. Roll the sausage up in the pastry to enclose and repeat with all the sausages. Put the sausage rolls in the fridge for 20 minutes for the pastry to harden.

Once the pastry is hard, remove the sausage rolls from the fridge and score the tops with a sharp knife for decoration, or prick with a fork. Brush well all over with the rest of the beaten egg and bake in the oven for 25–30 minutes, or until the pastry has turned golden-brown and looks crisp. Remove from the oven and leave to cool slightly before serving.

 

Variation:

Use viennas (Frankfurters) instead of the sausage

Shepherd’s Pie (Oond Frikkadel)

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Shepherd’s Pie  also known as Oond Frikkadel or Cottage Pie is a classic dish which pretty much everyone I’ve ever met has their own way of making. This is my way which I’ve kept really simple and it’s a winner every time I make it. Make sure you buy the best quality mince you can afford, as it really makes the dish, there’s nothing worse than an oily and fatty cottage pie.  This recipe serves 4.

Shepherd’s Pie, Cottage Pie, Oond Frikkadel

Ingredients:

500gr fat free minced meat

1 onion

1 small green pepper

1 tomato

1/2 bunch dhanya

1/2 teaspoon nutmeg

5 cloves garlic, crushed

1 slice slightly stale bread soaked in water

1 egg

salt & pepper to taste

 

Method:

Wash and drain minced meat well.

Soak bread in water and squeeze excess water out.

Chop onion, pepper, tomato, dhanya finely.

Add all the ingredients in a mixing bowl and mix thoroughly using your hands.

Bake in a preheated oven for 30-40 minutes at 180C.

Top with mashed potatoes and sprinkle with grated nutmeg.

Grill in the oven until top is slightly browned.

Serve with yellow rice, steamed vegetables or fresh salad.

Yellow Rice

 

 

YELLOW RICE

Serves 4

 

Ingredients:

2 cups uncooked basmati rice

¼ teaspoon turmeric

5 cardamom pods, crushed

3 stick cinnamons

50g butter

1 teaspoon salt

¼ cup sugar

½ cup raisins, optional

 

Method:

I always parboil my rice and then rinse as I don’t like the starch on the rice.

Using a large saucepan parboil the rice until half cooked approximately 5- 7 minutes.

Pour into a colander, rinse and return to the saucepan. Add the rest of the ingredients with a cup of water. Stir gently. Heat your saucepan over medium heat. Simmer for 6 minutes. Stir with a fork to fluff and loosen the grains, turn the heat off. Leave the sealed saucepan on the stove, the retained heat will complete the cooking process and any water left will be absorbed leaving you with fluffy and tender yellow rice.

 

Perfect with bobotie, frikkadel, roast, etc…

 

Hertsoggies / Hertzoggies

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Hertsoggies / Hertzoggies

This is so traditional in the Cape Malay community!  It’s a tremendously popular cookie/biscuit.

Named after General J.B.M. Hertzog, the prime minister of the Union of South Africa, from 1924 to 1939. It was apparently his favourite cookie.

Hertsoggies
Hertsoggies

 

Hertzoggies

Ingredients:

1 egg

125g butter, softened

65ml vegetable/sunflower oil

195ml sugar

500ml self raising flour

500ml cake / plain flour

drop vanilla essence

1 level teaspoon baking powder

 

Method:

Cream together egg, sugar, butter and oil until light and fluffy.

Mix in vanilla essence.

Sift in selfraising flour and cake flour and mix into creamed mixture to make a fairly stiff dough. roll out dough to 3 mm thick on a lightly floured surface and cut out shapes with flower shape biscuit cutter. Place on hertzoggie baking sheet. Place half teaspoons of coconut boiled with sugar and water. Bake at 200C for 10 minutes or until lightly browned. Place half teaspoon apricot jam next to coconut before serving.

 

The Cape Malay | South African History Online

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The Cape Malay | South African History Online.

 

The Cape Malay

The ‘Cape Malay’ community is rich in culture and religious traditions that have played a major role in shaping the history and diversity of Cape Town.

Origins

The exploration of the African continent in the fifteenth century and the colonization of South East Asia in the sixteenth century by European powers led to the enslavement of millions of Afro-Asian peoples. European powers exploited ethnic differences by employing the divide and rule tactic and used military conquest to subdue resistance by the local inhabitants.  As a consequence Europeans exercised almost total control over virtually  of these two continents. One of the reasons linked to colonial expansion in Africa and Asia was trade and the search for new markets. The need for labour to sustain trade created a massive international slave trade which led to the involuntary migration of large numbers of Africans and Asians to different parts of the world. For instance it is estimated that Africa alone supplied some 20 million slaves over three centuries in order to satisfy the American demand for labour.

Slavery at the Cape

Although slavery and the slave trade flourished off the coast of West and East Africa, Southern Africa remained largely untouched. This changed after the VOC established their presence at the Cape. Dutch settlers at the Cape of Good Hope arrived in 1652 when Jan van Riebeeck came to the Cape to establish a trading post and supply fort for trading vessels plying the Europe-East Indies route. The Dutch settlers were given land and required to produce enough food to meet the supply needs of the VOC ships and the settlement. Settlers or ‘free burgers’ that were granted land demanded cheap labour in order for them to produce enough supplies. The VOC used this as an opportunity to import political exiles from the East Indies to work as slaves in the Cape Colony.

The Malays waiting for the boats at Somerset Strand. Source: Franco Frescura Collection.

The VOC which colonised portions of South East Asia and practiced slavery introduced the system to the Cape. Those people that opposed the colonization and occupation of their lands by the Dutch were taken as political prisoners or shipped to exile at the Cape of Good Hope as slaves. The first slaves arrived in the latter half of the seventeenth century with the initial load coming from Africa. Their ship was captured by the Dutch from a Portuguese ship destined for Brazil. However, the majority of slaves were gradually brought to the Cape from the Dutch East Indies in Asia by the Dutch. A large majority of those being brought were Muslims, were captured and sent into exile from colonies such as Madagascar, India, Ceylon and the Dutch East Indies (known as Indonesia today). Other immigrants were from Philippines, Japan, Macau, Malacca, West Indies, Brazil and possibly New Guinea.

The origins of this migration can be traced to early in the sixteenth century when, at the end of Indonesia’s Majapahit Kingdom, European military penetration and anti-Islamic persecution caused resistance which was crushed by the Dutch. This led to many opponents of the Dutch being exiled to the Cape of Good Hope in southern Africa, which was also occupied by them. Some were also brought or captured from English, French and Portuguese ships. Included in this group were the Malay servants of the Dutch officials who were on their way back to the Netherlands from the East. The main group of African immigrant’s came from East Africa, Madagascar and West Africa. Many of these people were skilled artisans, such as silversmiths, milliners, cobblers, singers, masons and tailors. This group came to be known collectively as the ‘Cape Malay,’ despite their diverse origins as far afield as East Africa and Malaysia.

Anyone who opposed the colonization of their countries would be taken as political prisoners or exiles. It was one such group of people that were brought to the Cape of Good Hope. The first of these migrants arrived in the latter half of the seventeenth century, mainly from colonies in Africa and Asia that were occupied by the Dutch and the British.

The large majority being Muslims, were captured and sent into exile from colonies such as Madagascar, India, Ceylon and the Dutch East Indies (Indonesia as we know it today). Some immigrants were from Philippines, Japan, Macau, Malacca, West Indies, Brazil and possibly New Guinea. Some were also brought or captured from English, French and Portuguese ships. Included in this group were the Malay servants of the Dutch officials who were on their way back to the Netherlands from the East.

The main group of African immigrant’s came from East Africa, Madagascar and West Africa.

The origins of this migration can be traced to early in the sixteenth century when, at the end of Indonesia’s Majapahit Kingdom, European military penetration and anti-Islamic persecution caused resistance which was crushed by the Dutch. This led to many opponents of the Dutch being exiled to the Cape of Good Hope in southern Africa, which was also occupied by them.

The first Dutch settlers at the Cape of Good Hope arrived in 1652, when Jan van Riebeeck came to the Cape to establish a trading post and supply fort for trading vessels plying the Europe-East Indies route.

The Dutch required labour and utilised the opportunity to import political exiles from the East Indies as slaves. Many of these people were skilled artisans, such as silversmiths, milliners, cobblers, singers, masons and tailors. This group came to be known collectively as the ‘Cape Malay,’ despite their diverse origins as far afield as East Africa and Malaysia.

Orang Cayen – Men of Repute

Sheikh Yusuf

A portrait of Sheikh Yusuf

One prominent figure among the exiles, or Orang Cayen (Men of Repute), who resisted the Dutch occupation of the East Indies, was Sheikh Yusuf al-taj alkhalwatial-Maqasari. Credited with having brought Islam to South Africa, Sheikh Yusuf was born in 1626 in Goa on the island of Celebes (today known as Sulawesi). Sheikh Yusuf was the son of Makassarese nobility, and the nephew of King Bissu of Goa.

Sheikh Yusuf spent several years studying Arabic and traditional religious sciences in Mecca. He eventually returned to Banten, West Java, where he taught the Islamic doctrine of “Khalwatiyyah”, which he had learned during his years spent in Mecca.

He eventually joined forces with Sultan Ageng in his fight against the Dutch attempts to gain complete control of the Sultanates in the East Indies. In 1683, Sheikh Yusuf was captured and exiled to Ceylon and eventually brought to the Cape of Good Hope. On 2 April 1694, Sheikh Yusuf, together with 49 other Muslim exiles from the East Indies arrived at the Cape aboard the ship “de Voetboeg.”

Sheikh Yusuf, his family and followers were sent to Zandvliet farm at the mouth of the Eerste River, just outside Cape Town, to prevent his influence on the Islamic slave population. It is ironical that this farm had belonged to a minister of the Dutch Reformed Church, the Rev Petrus Kalden. Under the leadership of Sheikh Yusuf, who was 68 years of age at the time, the group at Zandvliet established one of the first elementary structures of a Muslim community. Dutch attempts to isolate them failed as Zandvliet became a gathering spot for Muslims and a rallying point for runaway slaves, and other exiles from the East. This farm area is now known as Macassar. As Sheikh Yusuf’s influence and spiritual teachings spread widely amongst the slaves at the Cape, they came to represent one of the first areas of resistance to colonisation at the Cape.

Repeated calls from the people and the King of Goa to have Sheikh Yusuf released and sent home were refused by the Dutch. In 1698, the Batavian Council issued a definite refusal to even consider the request and a year later on 23 May 1699, Sheikh Yusuf died. He was buried on a hill overlooking Macassar. A tomb constructed there in his memory is among the 25 Islamic shrines or kramats that encircle Cape Town. Sheikh Yusuf’s remains were brought to Makassar (Ujung Pandang of today) in 1705 and interred in a tomb located in Katangka Village, bordering on the Goa regency. The teachings of Sheihk Yusuf established a sound Muslim community at the Cape. His insightful approach and understanding of the religion still continues today.

Tuan Guru

Another prominent person was Imam Abdulla Kadi Abdus Salaam, or  as he is now referred to as ‘Tuan Guru’ (which means Master Teacher)  who was born in Tidore in Tinnate Islands of Indonesia in 1712 and became a Prince of this Muslim Sultanate. Tuan Guru was captured in 1780 by the Dutch for allegedly conspiring with the English and was sent as a religious prisoner to Robben Island. He was a keen academic and whilst he was a prisoner, he completed a book on Islamic law titled ‘Ma’rifant al-Islam wa al-Iman’ which explained practices of the Ash’ari creed of Sunnism and stressed the acceptance of the faith of Allah’s will in the world. This creed particularly suited the experiences of exiles and slaves. It also included discussions on scared cures and amulates, thus combining philosophical teaching with the more mystical faith that had developed amongst Cape Town’s underclass. Tuan Guru’s teaching and philosophy provided the basis of Cape Islam until mid-to-late nineteenth century. During this time there was a shift from a hidden and mystical form of Islam to a more open and public practice of the faith.

After his release in 1792, he set up a madrassah at his house in Dorp Street and by 1797; he was given permission to convert a warehouse in Dorp Street into the Auwal Mosque. It is said that Tuan Guru transcribed the Koran from memory as there were no copies at the Cape in his day. Later, when copies were brought to the Cape, it was found that his version contained very few errors. A kramat was erected to his honour on Robben Island.

The Holy circle of Kramats (tombs)

From the tomb of Sheikh Yusuf, a series of kramats stretch in a rough circle around the Peninsula. Besides Sheikh Yusuf’s shrine, these embrace the tombs on Robben Island, Signal Hill, Oude Kraal and Constantia.

The tombs of Signal Hill Cemetary belong to the three Tuans that are buried there: Guru,Syed and Nurman.

The second Tuan was known by the nickname ‘Oupa Skapie’.

The third Tuan may have come from Arabia but very little information is available on him.

It is believed that the kramat at Oude Kraal is that of Nureel Mobein who escaped from Robben Island. (No solid evidence to prove this is available; we can only rely on tradition.)

The question of identity

The terms Malay and Muslim are often used as synonyms but strictly speaking Malay stands for that section of the local Muslim community in which the descendents of Eastern Malays are to be found.

The question of identity has also been raised in South Africa, particularly by the minority communities as they formed part of the marginalised sectors of the community, oppressed masses and neglected groups. During the apartheid period, many rejected the racial policies of the White minority regime and never identified themselves as South Africans.

According to the Population Registration Act of 1950, South Africans were divided into four distinct  categories: Whites, Indians, African and Coloureds. The Coloured group was further sub-divided into ‘Cape Malay’, Khoisan, other Coloureds, Bastards, et al. Researchers have pointed out that the Coloured identity has never been seen as an identity in its own right because it has been negatively defined and did not fit the classificatory schemes created by the apartheid politicians. Most of the Western Cape’s Muslims were put into the ‘Cape Malay’ category and thus they inherited the negative connotations that were attached to this category of people. According to Muhammed Haron from the University of Botswana, researchers such as Robert CH Shell use the term ‘Cape Malay’ as many of them came from the east, although the term ‘Indonesian’ would have been fairly accurate. Shell explains that the Cape Muslims came to be known as ‘Cape Malay’ because Malay was the lingua franca of the Indonesian Archipelago and the language was widely spoken at the Cape during and prior to the nineteenth century.

This term remained employable by those who trekked to other parts of the country and neighbouring countries as well. There were occasions, however in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries that the ‘Cape Malays’ were regarded as respectable people who did not drink and were hard working and reliable. This differed from the other ‘Coloured’ groups and the ‘Malays’ seem to have maintained those distinctions mainly because of their religious and cultural traditions. During the traumatic socio-political and economic crises of the 1970’s and 1980’s, the ‘Coloureds’ and their sub-categories appended the term ‘so-called’ to their ethnic identities, this was a clear reflection of them experiencing an identity crisis. It was during these times that the younger generation of the ‘Cape Malay’ group preferred to be called South African Muslims instead of South African ‘Cape Malays’, thus employing the religious label instead of the ethnic one.

Achmat Davis believed that the term ‘Cape Malay’ was unacceptable as it teemed with racist prejudice. This belief was held by Davis at the time when the general Muslim populace sympathised and supported the internal and external liberation movements against apartheid. In the socio-political context of the time, the masses rejected all ethnic labels imposed by the state. However, Davids later accepted the term ‘Cape Malay’ and used it interchangeably with term ‘Cape Muslim’. There seems to be continuous conflict between those who are in favour of the term and those who opposed it.

Today, the ‘Cape Malay’ form the larger section of the local Muslims who can roughly be divided into two groups; the Cape Malay’s whose home language is Afrikaans and the Indians, who speak English and their own vernacular languages. For both groups, Arabic is the language of their religion but for the Cape Malay, it is supplemented by Afrikaans.

The ‘Cape Malay’ community generally speak mostly Afrikaans but also English, or local dialects of the two. Although they no longer speak the Malay languages and other languages which their ancestors used,  various Malay words and phrases can still be heard in Cape Town today.

Areas of Settlement

When the ‘Malay’ exiles and slaves arrived at the Cape, they settled at Gallows Hill which was later known as De Waterkant (today this form part of Green Point). The Gallowsteen or execution gallows was constructed here and slaves who protested against the cruelty of the Dutch were executed here. With the introduction of the Group Areas Act in 1950, all the families at Waterkant were forcibly moved to  the outer areas of Cape Town.

Bo-Kaap

Flowers seller, Adderley Street, Cape Town. Franco Frescura Collection.

Other Muslims slaves were scattered across the town before emancipation, although a number of Muslim free Blacks were beginning to concentrate in the area on the slopes of Lion’s Rump later known as the Bo-Kaap. Other slaves settled in the Devils Peak area which already had an established community.

By 1840, Cape Town established its first municipality and the cluster of houses from Hanover Street to Lowry Street then became known as District 12. By 1849, the population rose considerably and the area expanded rapidly due to the emancipation of a number of slaves. Many ‘Malays’ settled here, a number of whom lived in the area above the open field in the vicinity of Muir Street.

This area was originally known as Kanaladorp. This name was a mixture of Maleyu and Dutch and mostly likely referred to people assisting each other, a community spirit: the literal meaning being ‘if you please’.  Early Kanaladorp was not only ethnically mixed but socially as well.  In 1867, Cape Town was divided in six districts and Kanaladorp became the sixth district, henceforth people referred to the area as District Six.

District Six

District Six had a large concentration of ‘Malay’ people. This area was mainly a working class area. Living conditions varied enormously as you could find one family in a detached house while other house could contain up to 16 people in a single room.

Toilets were usually in the backyards and baths had to be taken in the kitchen in huge tubs. However, due to overcrowding, the area quickly turned into a slum area. In spite of this, there existed a joyous spirit and common bond amongst the inhabitants who had been living there for years. Sadly, in 1966, under the Group Areas Act, District Six was declared a ‘White’ area as government regarded the region as a health hazard to the city. As a result many ‘Malay’ people were moved along with others to the Cape Flats area.

Culture and traditions

The ‘Cape Malays’ have preserved their cultural identity and Islamic creed.

Language

The Afrikaans language evolved as a language of its own through a simplification of Dutch in order for the slaves to be able to communicate with the Dutch and amongst each other. Educated Muslims were the first to write texts in Afrikaans.

The ‘Cape Malay’ community generally speak mostly Afrikaans.  English is used to a lesser extent, or local dialects of the two can also be heard. Although they no longer speak the Malay languages and other languages which their ancestors used,  various Malay words and phrases can still be heard in Cape Town today for example: ‘terima kasin’ which is the Malay equivalent for ‘thank you’, and ‘salmaat djalen’ which is ‘good journey to you’.

Home life

The ‘Cape Malay’ people follow Islamic principles of living. On Thursday nights, Malay people burn incense sticks (niang) in preparation for Friday.

Fasts and feasts

A feast to which relatives are invited to is known as a ‘merang’ and it is usually held to celebrate a special occasion. The following fasts and feasts are observed by all Malay people.

Moulood’n-Nabi (Birthday of the Prophet- PBUH)

This day is celebrated on the 12th day of Rabi-ul-Auwal. The prayers for this day are certain recitations from the Quran and songs that are sung in harmony. Women practice at least three months in advance for this ceremony. The Malay community celebrate by going to the mosque on the Saturday afternoon where they cut up orange leaves which are then dipped into sweet smelling oils and tied up in sachets. This is known as ‘rampies sny’. At the evening prayer, at the mosque, sweetmeats are served and the little sachets of scented orange leaves are given out as gifts. This tradition which is believed to be of Indonesian origin gave the slaves a link to their ancestral home. The purpose of this ceremony is to send praises (salawat) to the Prophet (PBUH).

Mir’raj

This is a celebration in memory of the Prophet’s (PBUH) journey in one night from Mecca to Majid Al-Aqsa (known as Jerusalem)  and then to the 7th Heavens and back.

Roa

Roa is on the 15th of the Islamic month of Shabaan and is a feast of purification.

Ramadaan

The most important fast in the Muslim calendar is the month in which the revelation of the Koran began. All Muslims must observe it, except those who are ill, travellers, the old, women who are pregnant, and children under the age of puberty. The Muslim year is determined by the sighting of the moon and the fast commences by the new moon in the beginning of the ninth Islamic month.  The Islamic months consists of 29 or 30 days, depending on the sighting of the moon and the Islamic New Year starts on the month of Muharram and ends with the month Thul-Haj. The ‘Malay’ community refer to this fast as ‘poewasa’.

The most important day in the fast is the 27th night which is described in the Koran as the ‘night of power’. It is said in the Koran that during this holy night the sins of the faithful are forgiven and the angels and souls of Heaven come down to earth to perform many miracles.

The Malay people clean their houses in preparation for this night and candles are lit (kers-opsteek).

Lebaran Ramadaan (Eid-al-Fitr)

The sighting of the new moon again brings the holy month of Ramadaan to an end. This day is celebrated by all Muslims around the world. The day begins early as the men go to the mosque for a special Eid prayer or ‘Eid salaah’. Thereafter in their new clothes, families visit and greet each other. Gifts are exchanged and elaborate food is prepared for the day.

Lebaran Hadji (Eid-ul- Adha)

This feast is known throughout the Muslim world as Eid-al-Adha. It is held after the hajj pilgrimage. A sheep is sacrificed by families who can afford to do so and shared with the poor.

Malay Food

Popular amongst Malay people are dishes such as bredie, frikkadels, denningvleis, sabananvleis, pinangkerrie, sosastie and bobotie and although the ‘Malay ‘people have changed their diet, these dishes still seem popular at the Cape.

Stews, roasts and baked vegetables still form part of the Malay diet but the food is very peppery and spicy.

Contact with the Dutch colonists left it’s mark as many old Cape dishes such as ‘melktert’ and ‘koeksisters’ are still to be found in Malay homes.

Weddings

The Malay wedding. Franco Frescura Collection.

When a Malay man decides to get married, he asks his father to approach his prospective father in law and should they agree to the man’s hand in marriage then the couple become engaged or ‘lambaar’. A time is fixed for the wedding and money ‘maskowi’ is paid to the bride to be. This money, which varies in amount, is according to the groom’s means and is paid to the priest who hands It over to the bride.

On the wedding day, the bride wears a ‘medora’ or headdress which is reminiscent of the golden ballets of Bali, and receives her guests in her first wedding dress. She does not attend the wedding ceremony which takes place at the mosque but is represented by her father or another male member of her family. A feast takes place usually for lunch at the bride family. Thereafter she changes her dress and joins the groom’s family for supper. At the end of the evening the bride is taken to her new home by her in laws or ‘khujadi’s’.

Straw hat-toedang.

Early Malay dress

Early Malays wore a distinctive Mulsim style of dress: a toedang conical ‘kopdoek’ and the ‘kaparring’ wooden sandals, these originated in South-East Asia. Imams and others of higher status wore turbans.

The Khalifa

kaparang – wooden sandals.

The Khalifa is a ‘Malay’ sword dance which takes place on the 11th day of Rabi-al-Agier in honour of Abdul Kadir Beker, a follower of the Prophet (PBHU). Its original religious implications have been modified with the result that the Khalifah now amounts to a skilful exhibition of sword play. Some Imams condone it as symbolic of the power of flesh over steel through faith, while others disapprove. The players, invariably state that they are aided by prayer.

Although the Khalifah or chalifah is the name of the central person conducting the ceremony, in South Africa it is often used for the ceremony itself. The Malay people used the word ‘ratiep’ for the actual performance. It is said that if one attends a Khalifa performance, one becomes conscious of the hypnotic effect which the rebanas have in conjunction with the rhythmic chanting, the incense and the general performance. For the rest skilful sword play explains unusual dance.

New Year’s Carnival

Each year on the 2nd of January or ‘Tweede Nuwe Jaar’ the Bo Kaap celebrates a big street party, known as the ‘Coon Carnival’ in the centre of town. Originally, this was introduced by the Muslim slaves who celebrated their only day off work in the whole year. Nowadays men, woman and children march from the Grand Parade to the Green Point stadium. Plans for the parade are started a year in advance for the troupes that take part. Elaborate costumes are designed and sewn by ‘Malay’ tailors and are kept a secret until the day of the carnival as troupes are judged by their costumes, singing and dancing. Clad in colourful, shiny suits, hats and sun umbrellas, in true Rio Carnival style, the spirit and vitality of the Cape Minstrels continue to fascinate both tourists and locals alike. The ‘Coon Carnival’ has become one of the biggest events on the Cape Town calendar.

Music

This cultural group developed a characteristic type of Cape Malay music. One particular interesting secular folk song type, of Dutch origin, is termed the nederlandslied. The language and musical style of this genre reflects the history of South African slavery. Often, it is described and perceived as ‘sad’ and ’emotional’ in content and context. The nederlandslied shows the influence of the Arabesque (ornamented) style of singing which is unique in South Africa, Africa and probably in the world.

Conclusion

Remnants of the old ‘Malay’ culture is still to be found in Cape Town today as a thriving Cape Malay community lends character to the mother city of South Africa. Cape Malay architecture, food (such as bobotie and yellow rice, samoosas, rotis, etc.), tailor shops, mosques and the warmth and hospitality of the Malay people continue to attract tourists in abundance to the mother city.  Malaysians and Indonesians are starting to visit Cape Town in increasing numbers to experience this cultural link for themselves.

References

CMC PUBLICATIONS

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Ramadan Recipes – A collection of favourite Cape Malay recipes popular in the month of Ramadan. Recipes included are pancakes, roti, daltjies (pakoras), samosas, etc…

Ramadan Recipes 1432/33 (Paperback)

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Ramadan Recipes – A collection of favourite Cape Malay recipes popular in the month of Ramadan. Recipes included are pancakes, roti, daltjies (pakoras), samosas, etc…

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STUFFED BUTTERNUT SQUASH

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STUFFED BUTTERNUT SQUASH

Serves 4

Ingredients:

2 small butternut squashes

1 garlic clove, finely chopped

50g unsalted butter

Olive oil

75g walnuts, lightly toasted and very coarsely chopped

200g cheese of choice (blue cheese or feta cheese goes well with this), I used cheddar cheese

2 teaspoons chopped thyme (optional)

1 tablespoon runny honey

Salt and freshly ground black pepper

Method:

Make sure the outside of the squash is scrubbed clean. Cut the squash in half lengthways and scoop out the seeds and soft fibres. Put in a roasting dish, add the chopped garlic and a knob of butter to each cavity, brush with a little oil and season well. Place in an oven preheated to 190°C and bake for ¾-1 hour, until the flesh feels very tender when pierced with the tip of a knife.

Scoop the soft flesh and all the buttery, garlicky juices out into a bowl, leaving a 1cm thick layer of flesh still attached to the skin, so the squash holds its shape. Roughly mash the flesh. Keep back a few pieces of walnut and a little of the cheese, then fold the remaining walnuts and cheese into the soft squash, along with the thyme and some more salt and pepper.

Spoon the filling back into the empty squash halves and scatter on the reserved cheese and walnuts. Finish with the merest trickle of honey, return the squash to the oven and bake for 15 minutes, or until the cheese is bubbling. Serve with a crisp green salad, thinly sliced ciabatta for a great starter.

STUFFED BUTTERNUT SQUASH