Boeber

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Salwaa’s Boeber

A traditional South African Cape Malay recipe, the taste is so rich and sugary. Boeber is made of milk, vermicelli, sago, sugar or condensed milk flavoured with cardamoms, stick cinnamon and rose water. If you like a “thicker” boeber add more sago. Boeber is traditionally served on the fifteenth night of Ramadan to celebrate the middle of the fast. The evening of the 15th day of Ramadaan is special for those who had fasted the first 15 days. They are known as people who are ‘op die berg’ Many, many years ago after the taraweegh salaah, boeber was served at the mosques. Every family also made boeber for this particular night. After Taraweegh salaah, boeber was also sold at boeber houses at two pence a glass. There, friends would assemble and, if it were a Friday or Saturday, would stay up until sower (suhur) and then go to the masjid for Fajr.

To make boeber you will need the following:
50g butter
3/4 cup sago
200 ml water to soak the sago
250 ml vermicelli
3 cinnamon sticks
5 cardamoms
50 g sultanas (optional)
1.5 – 2 liters milk
1/2 tin condensed milk or sugar to taste
1 tin evaporated milk (optional)
1/4 cup of desiccated coconut
15 ml rose water (optional)
50 g blanched almonds (optional)

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Method:
Soak the sago in the water for about 15 minutes. Meanwhile, melt the butter in a saucepan.
When it has melted, add the vermicelli and toss it so that the butter covers it and it starts to go golden brown.
Add the cardamom, cinnamon and the sultanas.

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Stir before pouring the milk into the pan.
Bring to the boil before adding the pre-soaked sago and then simmer for about 30 minutes stirring constantly otherwise it will stick. Add evaporated milk. The sago should become transparent.

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Add the rose water (if using), condensed milk, coconut and almonds and continue to simmer for another 10 minutes or so. Serve hot and enjoy this rich, spicy drink…

Salwaa Smith – Cape Malay Cooking & Other Delights

From My Kitchen To Yours – keeping our heritage alive!

©️ All Rights Reserved @ Cape Malay Cooking

 

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Chocolate Pancakes / Crepes

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Salwaa’s Chocolate Pancakes / Crepes
Salwaa Smith – Cape Malay Cooking & Other Delights

Here is a delightful refreshing pancake recipe with a twist. Wow your family with this chocolate pancake, fill it with chocolate instant pudding, chocolate mousse, fresh fruit, fresh cream or a combination of everything. Indulge!

Ingredients:

2 cups cake/plain flour, sifted

Pinch of salt

3 Tbsp cocoa powder

2 extra large eggs

1 ½ cup milk

½ – ¾ cup water, depending how thin you want the batter

100g butter, melted

Method:

Sift the flour, cocoa powder and salt into a large mixing bowl. Make a well in the centre of the flour and break the eggs into it.

Next gradually add small quantities of the milk and water, still whisking (don’t worry about any lumps as they will eventually disappear as you whisk).

When all the liquid has been added, use a rubber spatula to scrape any bits of flour from around the edge into the centre, then whisk once more until the batter is smooth, with the consistency of thin cream. Now melt the 100g of butter in a pan. Spoon halve of it into the batter and whisk it in, then pour the rest into a bowl and use it to grease the pan, using a piece of kitchen paper to smear it round before you make each pancake.

Now get the pan really hot, then turn the heat down to medium and, to start with, do a test pancake to see if you’re using the correct amount of batter. I find 2 tbsp is about right for an 18cm pan. It’s also helpful if you spoon the batter into a ladle so it can be poured into the hot pan in one go. As soon as the batter hits the hot pan, tip it around from side to side to get the base evenly coated with batter. It should take only half a minute or so to cook. Flip the pancake over with a palette knife – the other side will need a few seconds only – then simply slide it out of the pan onto a plate. Keep warm and continue until all the batter has been used. Makes about 20 pancakes.



© Cape Malay Cooking & Other Delights

Ramadan Kareem!

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Ramadan Kareem from my kitchen to yours

Cape Malay Cooking & Other Delights – keeping our heritage alive

Ramadan – a brief explanation

Ramadan is the 9th month of the Islamic calendar,  a religious annual observance and month of fasting that is one of the Five Pillars of Islam. The time spent fasting is meant to be used for prayer, charity, spirituality, and for purifying the mind and body. The beginning and end of the month of Ramadan is determined by the sighting of the new moon. Muslims fast from before sunrise to sunset.

Dates & Mint Tea
Dates & Mint Tea

Does Ramadan always start on the same day?

No. Because Ramadan is a lunar month, it begins about 10 days earlier each year. During a Muslim’s life, Ramadan will fall during winter months, when the days are short, and summer months, when the days are long.

Why is the month so significant?

Principally because it is the month that Allah revealed the Quran to the last Prophet Muhammad, peace be upon him.

 

Who is exempt from fasting?

Those who are not required to fast during Ramadan are young children, (those who did not reach puberty) the sick or those with mental illnesses, travellers, the elderly and women who are menstruating, pregnant, breast-feeding or have recently had a baby.

 

The month of Ramadan contains the most blessed of nights – known as Laylatul Qadr – about which Allah, subhana wa t’ala, says:

‘What will make you realize what the Night of Power is like?

The Night of Power is better than a thousand months.

Angels and the Spirit descend upon it with their Lord´s permission with every command;

There is peace that night until the coming of dawn.

(Quran: 97:1-5)

 

Traditions

Muslims break their at sunset with dates or water. Traditionally we, the Cape Malays, will have a starter consisting of soup, samosas, dhaltjies, fritters. More often than not after prayers we will have a main meal. During Ramadan plates of food are shared with neighbours. Little children can often be seen carrying plates of food to neighbours, etc… The best charity, the best Zakah, the best Sadaqah is in Ramadan. Feeding the poor and needy fasting people is highly recommended in Ramadan. The Prophet (pbuh) said, ‘Whoever feeds a fasting person, will get a reward like him.’ (Ahmad) He also said, ‘Protect yourself from the fire even by giving half of a date.’ (Agreed upon)

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The benefits of Dates

The Prophet (pbuh) used to break his fasts by eating some dates before offering Maghrib prayer. Modern science has proved that dates are part of a healthy diet. They contain sugar, fat and proteins, as well as important vitamins. Dates are also rich in natural fibres. They contain oil, calcium, sulphur, iron, potassium, phosphorous, manganese, copper and magnesium. Dates and palms have been mentioned in the Holy Quran 20 times, thus showing their importance. The prophet likened a good Muslim to the date palm saying, “Among trees, there is a tree like a Muslim. It’s leaves do not fall.”

Dates and Tea

The Five Pillars of Islam include Sawm: Fasting during Ramadan, Hajj: a pilgrimage to Mecca at least once in their life, Zakat: giving to the poor, Salah: five-time daily prayer, facing Mecca, including absolution prior to prayer, Shahada: declaration of belief in one true God.

 

May you have a blessed spiritual uplifting month, ameen

Here’s the link to some of my favourite Ramadan treats.

 

 

Gulab Jamun

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Gulab Jamun

Salwaa Smith – Cape Malay Cooking & Other Delights

Gulab Jamuns are popular in South Asian cuisine. Crunchy on the outside, soft and chewy inside. Gulab Jamuns can be eaten as a dessert with ice cream or fresh cream. It can also be made during Ramadan to share with family, friends and neighbours. It is a great alternative to koesisters or doughnuts.

 

Gulab Jamun
Gulab Jamun

 Ingredients:

1 tin condensed milk (497g)

3 Tbsp butter, melted

½ tsp bicarbonate of soda

2 tsp baking powder

2 Tbsp semolina

1 tsp ground cardamom

½ tsp rose essence

2 – 2¼ cups cake flour, sifted

Oil for deep frying

 

For The Syrup

2 cups water

2 cups sugar

1 tsp rose essence

 

Desiccated coconut to finish

 

Method:

Using a medium size bowl whisk the condensed milk and melted butter together. Add the ground cardamom, baking powder, bicarb, essence and semolina whisk until the mixture turn creamy. Gradually add the flour to form a soft dough. (You may not need the full 2¼ cups of flour.) Leave to rest for about 10 minutes. Divide the dough into 30 pieces. Roll the pieces of dough into balls or into oblong shapes. Best to use a slightly floured surface (and hands) as the dough might be slightly sticky.

In the meantime add the syrup ingredients in a pot and bring to the boil. Boil until the sugar water turns sticky. Remove from the heat but keep warm to dip in the cooked gulab jamuns when done.

Heat the oil in a deep pot and deep fry the gulab jamuns on medium heat, take care not to over crowd the pot as the gulab jamuns will swell considerably. Fry until deep brown stirring all the time to get an even colour all over. Remove and drain excess oil on kitchen paper. Cool slightly before dipping in the warm sugar syrup and rolling it in desiccated coconut.

 

Cook’s note:

You may not need all the flour, add the flour gradually

You may leave the jamuns drenched in the syrup of you like it sweet and syrupy until it is ready to be served.

Gulab Jamun
Gulab Jamun

 

 

 

Boeber – 15th Ramadaan

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Boeber - Traditional Milk Drink
Boeber – Traditional Milk Drink

A traditional South African Cape Malay recipe, the taste is so rich and sugary. Boeber is made of milk, vermicelli, sago, sugar or condensed milk flavoured with cardamoms, stick cinnamon and rose water. If you like a “thicker” boeber add more sago. Boeber is traditionally served on the fifteenth night of Ramadan to celebrate the middle of the fast. The evening of the 15th day of Ramadaan is special for those who had fasted the first 15 days. They are known as people who are ‘op die berg’ Many, many years ago after the taraweegh salaah, boeber was served at the mosques. Every family also made boeber for this particular night. After Taraweegh salaah, boeber was also sold at boeber houses at two pence a glass. There, friends would assemble and, if it were a Friday or Saturday, would stay up until sower (suhur) and then go to the masjid for Fajr.

To make boeber you will need the following
100g butter
1/3 cup sago
1 cup water to soak the sago
1 – 1 1/2 cups crushed vermicelli
3 cinnamon sticks
5 cardamoms
50 g sultanas
2 litres milk
15 ml rose water (optional)
150 – 200ml white sugar (depending on your taste buds)
50g blanched almonds

Method:
Soak the sago in the water for about 15 minutes. Meanwhile, melt the butter in a saucepan.
When it has melted, add the vermicelli and toss it so that the butter covers it and it starts to go golden brown.
Add the cardamom, cinnamon and the sultanas.
Stir before pouring the milk into the pan.
Bring to the boil before adding the pre-soaked sago and then simmer for about 30 minutes stirring constantly otherwise it will stick. The sago should become transparent.
Add the rose water (if using), sugar and almonds and continue to simmer for another 10 minutes or so. Serve hot and enjoy!!!
Serve hot and prepare to enjoy this rich, spicy and flavourful drink.

Boeber 3

Boeber 2
© Cape Malay Cooking & Other Delights