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Tomato Pootjies / Trotters


Salwaa Smith – Cape Malay Cooking & Other Delight
From My Kitchen To Yours – keeping our heritage alive since 2001!

Salwaa’s Tomato Trotters / Pootjies In Tamatie / Tomato Paya

Pootjies en Tamatie

In time gone by this dish was almost always served at thikrs, gadats, weddings or any family functions. Nowadays, it’s see as delicacy and not many people make it. Before cooking ensure all the little hairs are removed from the trotters / pootjies. Some butcher shops sell the trotters already cleaned. In the past a razor blade was used to scrape the hair off and then it was further cleaned by burning the small hairs over an open flame.

Ingredients:
8 cleaned sheep trotters or ox trotter cut into pieces. Cover with water, add a few bay leaves. Bring to the boil and cook until the trotters are soft and tender. The trotters will have to cook/simmer over medium heat for at least 2 hours to ensure its tender. Top up with water as needed.

Cook the trotters/ pootjies until soft

When the trotters are cooked, keep the liquid aside and use the liquid when cooking the tomatoes for extra flavour.

1 Tbsp cooking oil
1 kg red ripe tomatoes, washed, chopped or liquidised

1 tin of chopped tomatoes
3 cloves of garlic, crushed
2 large onion, chopped
2 tsp salt or too taste
2-3 chopped green chillies (use more or less according to your taste)
2 Tbsp tomato paste
3 large potatoes, peeled and sliced into quarters, optional
2 Tbsp sugar or to taste

Method:
Heat the oil in a saucepan, over medium heat.
Sauté the onions in the oil until soft and golden brown.
Add the cooked trotters and cook over medium heat for about 5 minutes.
Add the chopped / liquidised tomato, garlic, salt, chillies and tomato paste and simmer a further 30 minutes until the tomato has cooked through and the sauce has thickened.
Add the potatoes and cook until the potatoes are soft.
Lastly add the sugar, cook a further 5 minutes.
Serve warm with steamed / boiled white rice.

Cooks Tip:
Use the liquid of cooked trotters in food and not water.
DO NOT add the sugar until the potatoes are completely soft as the sugar will prevent the potatoes from softening.
Prepare the Bredie a day in advance and leave in the refrigerator. Vegetable bredie’s flavour enhances if it eaten the next day. Reheat and serve with boiled rice.

Tripe Curry


Tripe Curry (Pens Kerrie) – Salwaa Smith – Cape Malay Cooking & Other Delights

A traditional South African delicacy that remains a favourite in many homes. You either love it or don’t like it.

 

Tripe Curry / Pens Kerrie

Tripe Curry / Pens Kerrie

Ingredients:

1 kg clean tripe

1 tsp salt

3 bay leaves

3 large onions, finely chopped

2 medium tomatoes, grated

2 tsp garlic

1 ½ tsp turmeric/borrie

1 ½ tsp coriander/koljana

1 green chilli, chopped

1 tsp chilli powder

1 tsp salt

2 tsp leaf masala

 

Method:

Boil the tripe with one teaspoon salt, bay leaves and enough water to cover until soft, about 2 hours. Drain and reserve the water. Allow the tripe to cool down before cutting it into strips. Set aside whilst making the sauce.

Fry the onions in a large pot until transparent and soft. Stir in the grated tomatoes, garlic, turmeric, coriander, green chillies, chilli powder, salt and the leaf masala. Simmer over low heat until the gravy is well blended and cooked through, this should take about 20 minutes to get a nice thick gravy. Add from the reserved water if needed. Add the strips of tripe and cook a further 15 minutes stirring every now and then, adding water if necessary. Serve with boiled white rice. Serves 6

 

Variation:

Add soft boiled sugar beans when adding the tripe

Add 1 cup of steamed gram dhal when adding the tripe.

 

Click here for details of where to by the NEW Cape Malay & Other Delights Cookbook

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